CNBC has an interesting article on streaming which is focused on Spotify's efforts to survive the costs of growth which include the cost of acquiring new subscribers and artist and record label demands to be paid more for streaming their music.

The article also talks about court cases that will ultimately set the cost per stream.  The article says Apple has suggested 9.1 cents ($.09) for 100 streams which amounts to .00091 per stream.

The decision expected at some point in 2017 will determine pay rates until 2022 and Apple has suggested a flat rate of 9.1 cents per 100 streams.

I believe this is an error because Spotify currently pays from $.006-.008 per stream.  I suspect that Apple is suggesting $.0091 per stream or $.91 per 100 because that is close to the rate I currently see on my streams, which is much better than Spotify. So if Spotify has to pay the rated suggested by Apple, they might have to surrender their butts to the giant.

At point I saw Spotify promoting a Family Plan which allowed six users to stream unlimited amounts for $15/mo.  I don't see how they could pay for the music and the infrastructure when charging so little.

I can tell you from my own experience that Apple Music has paid the most per stream of any of the streaming services, averaging around .01 per stream. 

There are many other interesting angles to this story and I encourage you to read the entire article here.

 

This article says that streaming is now 51% of music sales and the dollar amount of sales is up by a billion dollars.

They also suggest that CDs are done for good.  But there are other indicators that they are starting to come back.

For the record, I don't use Autotune on my recordings.  When I sing in public, I'm actually singing, too.  :-)

The Wall Street Journal reports on how legacy acts dominate concerts and ticket sales and asks what happens to the business as they die off.

It’s going to be easier to become a performer with an audience, but harder to become an entrenched arena act,” Nathan Hubbard, forker chief executive of Ticketmaster, wrote in an online piece for the website The Ringer last year.

Last year, Prince’s greatest-hits album, “The Very Best of Prince,” released in 2001, sold nearly 670,000 copies in the U.S. That was more than Rihanna’s “Anti,” which sold 603,000 copies, or Justin Bieber’s “Purpose,” which sold 554,000, two hit records that were among the year’s biggest sellers, according to Nielsen.

In today's music market, it should be easy for a lot of musicians to make a modest living from. their work because there are so many ways they can build an audience on their own.  I think that audiences need to get used to that idea and become more independent is how they choose which artists to listen to and support.

The release of my first three Trumplandia Cathedral tracks is now complete.

Trumplandia Cathedral (Translation Mix) was released today.  You can hear it on my music tab and also at most other online music sites like Apple Music and Spotify.  The translation mix is the English translation of Trumplandia Cathedral (Gibberish Mix).

Sometime next week (the week of March 12), I'm planning to release an instrumental mix of Trumplandia Cathedral.  Are you ready?  :-)

Tomorrow marks the beginning of a new musical adventure for me.  I'm releasing my first dance track.  It's called Trumplandia Cathedral (Gibberish Mix).  It will be available on iTunes, Amazon, CDbaby.com, Bandcamp, Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube and many other sites.

There are plenty of places you can hear it for free.  I'd love to know what you think of it.

Here's the cover art which is a NASA image of the Helix Nebula.

It's not just vinyl sales that are soaring.  Consumers are buying books in actual bookstores, board games and also film-based cameras.  Digital technology is a great thing, but my opinion this new embrace of the non-digital is a great thing.

Check out this short, interesting video on the subject.

Former Federal Reserve analyst, Danielle DiMartino Booth, has published a book called Fed Up: An Insider's Take On Why The Federal Reserve Is Bad For America.  She was recently interviewed in a podcast with Chris Martenson of PeakProsperity.com.  I have embedded the podcast below.

I enjoyed the podcast very much but it wasn't a lot of new information for me because I've been following the subject for many years.  She discusses the inner workings of the echo chamber of "experts" on the Federal Reserve's FOMC and how their radical zero interest and QE policies have impacted the economy, the bond market and pension funds.

 

Why am I writing about this on musician website? Because it directly relates to my song Billion Dollar Pill which I wrote in 2011 when the economy was still hurting from the crash of the housing bubble of 2006 which bottomed in 2008.  I believe the Fed has not really fixed anything, but merely blown another bubble.  With the help of other central banks around the world it is bigger than both the dot.com bubble and the housing bubble and global in scale.  At some point in the future, my song Billion Dollar Pill will be very relevant again.

I'm sure her book is very interesting but I won't be buying it.

For songwriters and musicians getting their songs on playlists can mean a lot of streams and some real revenue.  But how do you get on them?  You can answer that question with one word: Payola!

Payola has been around for a long time and refers to the practice of record companies paying radio stations to play their music.  Because streaming has replaced radio to some extent and the playlist has replaced the DJ, payola has now infected the streaming world when there is payment to be on playlists.

Billboard has a great article on the subject from August 19, 2015.

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